A few Google Geo Presentations

imageIt’s been a busy year so far and therefore my posting has been woefully slow. Much have my time has been working with Google Earth Builder. This provides a new way of distributing geospatial information from Google into all sorts of clients, providing a true geospatial platform as a service without the need to worry about how many servers or virtual servers you need to support your clients, allowing GIS experts to worry about geospatial information science rather than geospatial information systems. There will be more information coming out about this platform over the next few months and I hope I can talk to as many people as possible about how they may use this to share their data and collaborate with their clients, removing the complexity, headaches and expense that this causes with current geospatial systems. If you want to know more watch the Where 2.0 video below.

More Google Geo Goodness

Where 2.0 wasn’t the only conference recently, last week at Google IO 2011 there was a veritable plethora of geospatial talks on all of the aspects of Google Geospatial. Two talks stood out for people imagewho might be using and sharing geospatial data, the first about Google Fusion Tables and the second on the surprises of the maps API. The latter presentation gives a good overview of some of the new geospatial functions with the whole Maps API that you might have missed over the last year including. Geospatial at Google is a ever increasing area which touches lots and lots of products, that are easy to use and implement for non-geo experts which increases the reach of geospatial data to more people, this talk is a great intro to all of these.

Fusion tables, GIS for normal people.

Fusion tables continues to add more and more functionality that will allow the geo-prosumer to create and share spatial data in record time. One of the main additions has been that of extra styling functions to the product allowing people to create more engaging maps which in turn help convey the message easier to non-geo people, you can get some more details here. If you wanted to know more about Fusion Tables then this talk is a much watch to show how you can host and map geospatial information from the Google cloud without a single line of code, something I would never have imagined possible when I started doing this GIS malarkey in the early 90’s.

Speed, Speed, Speed

A final geo talk at Google IO that caught my attention was one about how to improve the performance of any mapping application using the Google Maps API. I’ve spent a good portion of my career trying to improve the speed of web applications and especially geospatial web applications. It’s good to be armed with knowledge before you even start any development, this presentation hopefully will help you avoid the pitfalls that people go through when starting developing in this area.

If you combine this with articles from the Google Maps website, such as Too Many Markers, then you can hopefully create speedy maps that are a joy and not a curse to use.

You can find more information and sessions from Google IO 2011 at the website here. If you set the filter to Geo you can see all of the presentations that had a geo flavour. Hopefully I’ll be presenting at the Google Enterprise Geospatial day at the end of august. If your into geospatial and Google it will be like a mini Geo-IO. Hope to see you there.

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